“Say a prayer and kiss your heart goodbye” | An Interview With The Animation Director Behind The WHO’S THAT GIRL Titles Sequence

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Say a prayer and kiss your heart goodbye —Madonna

Who’s That Girl may not be the most memorable movie of Madonna’s career, but its main titles are unforgettable.

The animated (in both senses of the term) intro directed by Ric Machin of Broadcast Arts offers not only a preamble to the narrative, but a lesson in how to make your main titles pop — even further than the film, in this case. Even filmmaker James Foley concedes that they are “maybe the best ‘scene’ in the movie” about a bleached blond manic pixie ex-con with a penchant for tutus (this is Madge circa 1987, remember) who joins forces with a lawyer (An American Werewolf in London’s Griffin Dunne) to prove her innocence. Co-written by Canadian Newsroom creator Ken Finkleman, of all people, this screwball comedy is only really noteworthy as a time capsule of the Queen of Pop’s True Blue years. But the credits? Those are a thing of art.

The entire opening sequence, set to Madonna’s catchy ’80s groove “Causing a Commotion,” animates the events leading up to Nikki Finn’s arrest, a swinging key at the end dissolving into the one in her jail cell. The freneticism and overall anarchy of the main character is captured by the equally chaotic artwork in which the colours don’t always fill in (if they are coloured at all) and the seams make the odd appearance. While the bobble-headed vixen at the center is clearly formed, everything around her seems to fall apart, much like it does in the film. Sketched in grease pencil, per cameraman Glen Claybrook, “This gave it a vibrant, sketchy feel, sort of like old xerography animation.” Director James Foley came up with the idea for an animated intro, Madonna wrote the song for it, and late Argentinian artist Daniel Melgarejo conceived the bobble-headed commotion-causing babe. “He did some sketches and just thought he caught the energy of Nikki Finn,” Foley says. “Love how his angular style matched the sonics of the song.”

A discussion with Who’s That Girl Animation Director RIC MACHIN. Continue reading ““Say a prayer and kiss your heart goodbye” | An Interview With The Animation Director Behind The WHO’S THAT GIRL Titles Sequence”

Full transcript of Madonna’s Women’s March Speech

“Hello. Are you still awake out there? Are you sure about that? Can you hear me? Are you ready to shake up up the world?

Welcome to the revolution of love. To the rebellion. To our refusal as women to accept this new age of tyranny. Where not just women are in danger but all marginalized people. Where people uniquely different might be considered a crime. It took us this darkness to wake us the fuck up.

It seems as though we had all slipped into a false sense of comfort. That justice would prevail and that good would win in the end. Well, good did not win this election but good will win in the end. So what today means is that we are far from the end. Today marks the beginning, the beginning of our story. The revolution starts here. The fight for the right to be free, to be who we are, to be equal. Let’s march together through this darkness and with each step. Know that we are not afraid. That we are not alone, that we will not back down. That there is power in our unity and that no opposing force stands a chance in the face of true solidarity.

And to our detractors that insist that this March will never add up to anything, fuck you. Fuck you. It is the beginning of much needed change. Change that will require sacrifice, people. Change that will require many of us to make different choices in our lives, but this is the hallmark of revolution. So my question to you today is are you ready? I said, are you ready? Say yes, we are ready. Say, yes we are ready. One more time: you’re ready.

Yes, I’m angry. Yes, I am outraged. Yes, I have thought an awful lot of blowing up the White House, but I know that this won’t change anything. We cannot fall into despair. As the poet, W.H. Auden once wrote on the eve of World War II: We must love one another or die.

I choose love. Are you with me? Say this with me: We choose love. We choose love. We choose love.”

5 Times Madonna Was a Badass & Said Exactly What She Was Thinking

Madonna onstage during the Women’s March on Washington on Jan. 21, 2017 in Washington, DC.

Madonna is no stranger to expressing exactly how she’s feeling. In front of a crowd of protestors at the Women’s March on Washington (and, in turn, in front of a worldwide audience, as her words unsurprisingly made headlines, stat), the pop icon flat-out admitted to being outraged over the political state of the U.S: “Yes, I have thought an awful lot about blowing up the White House,” she said at the Jan. 21 event, where it’s estimated that more than 400,000 people gathered to march for women’s rights.

That heated line was only a small part of her fiery speech, and it was one that she later said was taken out of context by the media. Her full speech was one of preaching love, hope and action, but it still takes a rebel to say those controversial words in public.

Simply put, Madonna is a badass. In light of her being the talk of pop culture and politics this weekend, let’s look at five times the Queen of Pop pushed the boundaries — and did it well.

That Fiery Rally Speech, Featuring a Few F-Bombs on Live TV
In Madonna’s speech at the Women’s March on Washington, she urged people to “say yes, we are ready” to start a revolution in the name of freedom and equality. She also dropped a handful of expletives during its live broadcast, leading at least two networks to cut away from it. (Three expletives, for those keeping score: “It took us this darkness to wake us the f— up,” “And to our detractors that insist that this march will never add up to anything, f— you,” and, for good measure, another “F— you.”)

What raised even more eyebrows, of course, was her comment about “blowing up the White House.” Of course, anyone who listened to her speech in full — rather than just skimming over a sensational headline — knows she went on to say that violence is not the path one should take: “But I know that this won’t change anything. We cannot fall into despair,” she said. Continue reading “5 Times Madonna Was a Badass & Said Exactly What She Was Thinking”

Madonna: “I choose LOVE! Are you with me?”

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Madonna:

Yesterday’s Rally. was an amazing and beautiful experience.
I came and performed Express Yourself and thats exactly what i did.
However I want to clarify some very important things.

I am not a violent person, I do not promote violence and it’s important people hear and understand my speech in it’s entirety rather than one phrase taken wildly out of context.My speech began with ” I want to start a revolution of love.” ♥️ I then go on to take this opportunity to encourage women and all marginalized people to not fall into despair but rather to come together and use it as a starting point for unity and to create positive change in the world.

I spoke in metaphor and I shared two ways of looking at things — one was to be hopeful, and one was to feel anger and outrage, which I have personally felt. However, I know that acting out of anger doesn’t solve anything. And the only way to change things for the better is to do it with love.
It was truly an honor to be part of an audience chanting “we choose love

Madonna on Trump: ‘We have gone as low as we can go’

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NEW YORK (AP) — Madonna, an outspoken critic of President-elect Donald Trump, is trying to put a positive spin on his Friday inauguration.

“He’s actually doing us a great service, because we have gone as low as we can go,” she said Thursday night. “We can only go up from here, so what are we going to do? We have two choices, destruction and creation. I chose creation.”

The superstar, dressed in all black and wearing a shirt that read “Feminist,” spoke at the Brooklyn Museum with artist Marilyn Minter about art in a time of protest, among other things, in a discussion moderated by author and poet Elizabeth Alexander, who performed a work at the first inauguration of President Barack Obama.

A clip of author James Baldwin, an inspiration of Madonna’s, played before the talk, as did her 2013 short film “Secret Revolution,” dedicated to people whose rights have been abused and denied.

On the eve of Trump becoming president, both Madonna and Minter vowed to lead protests against him, including attending Saturday’s Women’s March in Washington. Continue reading “Madonna on Trump: ‘We have gone as low as we can go’”

Madonna Will Join Marilyn Minter @ “The Brooklyn Museum” On January 19th

Madonna will join Marilyn Minter at the Brooklyn Museum on January 19th to talk art, culture, feminism, and the current state of affairs. For a chance to be in the audience, pick a photo that defines art for feminism to you and share a link to it as a comment to this post  on Madonna’s facebook + the #MadonnaxMarilynMinter hashtag before Midnight on January 15th. Good luck!!!

MADONNA’S SPRING AWAKENING

HB (6).jpgMadonna has no patience for bad wine. I learned this while sitting in a well-appointed living room at her New York City home, with Nina Simone playing softly in the background. I must tell you, Madonna’s house smells amazing—something delicious, maybe roasted chicken, was cooking in a kitchen elsewhere in the manse, and there was a gentle fragrance in the air, jasmine, perhaps. While I waited for Madonna, her day-to-day manager, her publicist, and I chatted while reclining on gorgeous cream-colored furniture set upon the largest rug I’d ever seen, on top of immaculate black wood floors. On the wall behind me was a black-and-white photograph of a woman perched on the edge of a mussed bed, scantily clad, sucking on a gun, it’s Helmut Newton’s “Girl with Gun” photograph. Of course.

Madonna was late, but that didn’t matter because she is Madonna. What is time, really? She was all apologies when she arrived, and we quickly got down to business. She was in the process of planning a fund-raiser at Art Basel in Miami Beach, and like any perfectionist she wanted to taste the wines that could be served. She knelt on the floor as she considered various reds and whites and a rosé—or “summer water,” as she called it. “Roxane,” Madonna said. “You don’t have to wear that dress tonight. …” That’s when I exhaled. This was familiar territory. My name is part of a well-known song or two. I smiled and said, “No, I do not.” At one point she asked me for my opinion on a particularly troublesome wine, handed me her glass, and swore she didn’t have anything contagious. I believed her and took a sip. To be fair, the wine was terrible—it tasted like vinegar—and the year on the bottle said 2016, so it wasn’t really wine yet. It was the suggestion of wine.

Madonna is very good at multitasking. While she was considering the wines, she held forth with me, and before long she was done with the bad wine. “Take the mediocre out of here,” she tells Dustin, the strapping young man who served all the wine and apologized for its mediocrity even though that mediocrity was not his fault. “I’ll go broke before I drink bad wine,” she declared, and I was entirely in agreement. I wanted nothing more than for Madonna to offer her opinions on wine for the rest of the evening. Dustin promptly brought us the good wine, served in a crystal decanter. I drank it, and it was, indeed, good.

In the days leading up to our conversation, I kept wondering what I could possibly ask Madonna that she hadn’t already been asked. She has been a figure in popular culture for more than 30 years. There was plenty I was curious about. I mean, I grew up on her music. As a good Catholic girl, I was obsessed with “Like a Prayer” and how she blended transubstantiation and eroticism. I listened to The Immaculate Collection nonstop. I coveted her book Sex, which came out just as I turned 18. I’ve been intrigued by her personal life. I’ve admired her stamina and artistic evolution. But I didn’t want to ask silly questions. I didn’t want to pry even though my job was, of course, to pry.

Over the course of an hour, we talked about a great many things, but we started with her upcoming movie project, Loved, an adaptation of Andrew Sean Greer’s novel The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells. On her coffee table, there were binders filled with research for the project—potential settings, costumes, and so on. Madonna is thorough. In fact, she co-wrote the screenplay and will be directing the film. The novel follows the title character as she moves through time and negotiates three different lives she could have lived. The story also focuses on Greta’s relationship with her gay twin brother, Felix, in those different lives. “It touches on a lot of really important topics I’ve always been invested in or championed—fighting for women’s rights, gay rights, civil rights, always fighting for the underdog,” Madonna says. “I’ve always felt oppressed. I know a lot of people would go, ‘Oh, that’s ridiculous for you to say that. You’re a successful white, wealthy pop star,’ but I’ve had the shit kicked out of me for my entire career, and a large part of that is because I’m female and also because I refuse to live a conventional life. I’ve created a very unconventional family. I have lovers who are three decades younger than me. This makes people very uncomfortable. I feel like everything I do makes people feel really uncomfortable. Why does this book appeal to me? Why did I want to adapt it into a screenplay? Because it touches me on so many levels and it deals with so many important topics. Right now, more than ever, it’s an extremely timely story to tell.”

Continue reading “MADONNA’S SPRING AWAKENING”